Outdoor District Soccer 2017-04-02T18:57:05+00:00

Outdoor District Recreational Soccer

At the age of 9, children graduate from mini-soccer to district youth soccer (either recreational or developmental). RA Steen Community Centre organizes the district recreational youth soccer program, in conjunction with St. Charles Soccer Association. District developmental soccer is organized and managed entirely by the St. Charles Soccer Association, through the St. Charles Force program.
In the past, there has been a significant “jump” for kids transitioning from mini to district soccer. The LTPD program (introduced in the St. Charles Soccer District in 2012) attempts to smooth this transition for our youngest district youth players. Nonetheless, there are some significant differences between mini and district youth soccer.
Starting at the U9 level, children are divided by gender into teams, and boys and girls no longer play against each other. Children are placed on teams representing their community centre and play games against other community centre teams throughout the St. Charles Soccer district. The district youth soccer program, including game and referee schedules and field maintenance, is managed by the district – St Charles Soccer Association.

  • The U9 program follows the Canada Soccer Association’s FUNDAMENTALS program.
  • The U10 – U12 program follows the Canada Soccer Association’s LEARN TO TRAIN program.

U9 and U10

  • Under 9 (U9) (Age 9, depending on their birthday, children may be 8 or 9 during the outdoor season (May and June) but will turn 9 by 31 December of the calendar year).
  • Under 10 (U10) (Age 10, depending on their birthday, children may be 9 or 10 during the outdoor season (May and June) but will turn 10 by 31 December of the calendar year).

6 v 6 (5 plus a goal tender)

Children play on teams with a maximum roster size of 12. Games are played on dedicated LTPD U9 and U10 size fields, with appropriate fixed goals. On the field, there are 6 players at a time, five plus a goal tender. Size 4 balls are used. Fixed positions are not assigned and all children should have a chance to play each position on the field (though in any given game, a child may play a fixed position to help minimize confusion). All children will take turns playing goal tender. The intention is that every child gets a lot of chances to kick the ball. Unlike mini soccer, the game more closely resembles a FIFA soccer game. There are no off-sides at this level, but throw-ins are introduced. The field is lined with an 18 and 6 yard box, and rules for goalies within those boxes are introduced. Goalies also take goal kicks and drop kicks. Corner kicks are also introduced. Players are substituted on and off the field during the game. Referees are provided by the district for the games. All children must wear shin pads and soccer cleats. A full uniform kit (socks, shorts, and team jersey) is provided to each child and included in the cost of registration. The uniform kit may be kept at the end of the season.

 

U11 and U12

  • Under 11 (U11) (Age 11, depending on their birthday, children may be 10 or 11 during the outdoor season (May and June) but will turn 11 by 31 December of the calendar year).
  • Under 12 (U12) (Age 12, depending on their birthday, children may be 11 or 12 during the outdoor season (May and June) but will turn 12 by 31 December of the calendar year).

8 v 8 (7 plus a goal tender).

Children play on teams with a maximum roster size of 14. Games are played on dedicated 3/4 size fields, with appropriate fixed goals. On the field, there are 8 players at a time, seven plus a goal tender. Size 4 balls are used. By the U11 age, most children begin to have a preference for playing forward vs. defensive. However, fixed positions should not be assigned and all children should still have a chance to play each position on the field (though in any given game, a child may play a fixed position to help minimize confusion). To develop their full set of skills, children need to learn to play both offensively and defensively. Also, some children who were not comfortable in a particular position at age 7 or 8 may find that they suddenly love a new position at age 11 or 12. Thus, to maximize children’s developmental opportunities, they should not be relegated to a particular position at too young an age. All children will take turns playing goal tender. The intention continues to be that every child gets a lot of chances to kick the ball. Unlike mini soccer, the game more closely resembles a FIFA soccer game. The off-side rule is introduced at the U11 level. The field is lined with an 18 and 6 yard box, and rules for goalies within those boxes are introduced. Goalies also take goal kicks and drop kicks. Corner kicks are also introduced. Players are substituted on and off the field during the game, with a maximum of three players substituted at any one time. Referees are provided by the district for the games. All children must wear shin pads and soccer cleats. A full uniform kit (socks, shorts, and team jersey) is provided to each child and included in the cost of registration. The uniform kit may be kept at the end of the season.

The outdoor season runs from early May until early July. No standings are kept. However, teams have the option of entering several tournaments during the season, to give children the experience of a structured, tournament environment. For example, in May WYSA runs the Boston Pizza Players Tournament at John Blumberg Fields (see http://players.winnipegyouthsoccer.com/) for details. The Phoenix Soccer Club runs the Phoenix Slurpee Cup in June (see: http://www.phoenixsoccer.ca/page/show/1250691-tournaments) for details. Other tournament options are also available, see St. Charles Soccer Association and Winnipeg Youth Soccer Association for more details. The season ends with a city-wide Jamboree weekend, hosted by WYSA, and usually played at Grant Park fields, in early July.

The U10 and U12 teams play on Monday and Wednesday evenings, while U9 and U11 teams play on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Thus, each year, a player will alternate between playing on Mondays/Wednesdays and Tuesday/Thursdays.

The coach, assistant coaches, and managers are normally parents of players on the team, and quite often have progressed from being a mini-soccer coach. The Manitoba Soccer Association runs FUNDAMENTALS and LEARN TO TRAIN coaching programs, which provides information about the Long Term Player Development-appropriate training and games program appropriate to this age level. The St. Charles Soccer Association pays the fees for all coaches to attend and acquire their Fundamentals & Learn to Train coaching certification, which is a WYSA requirement. Developing coaching skills is a priority for both RA Steen Community Centre and the St Charles District, with the latter providing a professional coaching development through the Technical Director and Assistant Technical Director to help community coaches improve their knowledge and skills.

All coaches and assistant coaches must have a CPIC (criminal police check) and CAR (child abuse registry) check before they are allowed to be on the bench. Coaches and assistants must possess an ID card with their picture on it (obtained from the SCSA). Coaches and assistants must also complete the on-line “Respect in Sport” program and provide verification of this for their coaches’ certification. Where a coach is a different gender than the players, then a person of the same sex as the players must be present on the bench (but that person can be any parent – a CPIC/CAR need not be performed for them). For each game, one parent from each team volunteers to act as a linesperson, signalling when the ball goes out of bounds. In addition, one parent acts as a referee liaison, assisting the referee if necessary to help keep the spectators from verbally (or physically) abusing team members or the referee. No abuse is tolerated – a spectator who abuses the referee or players in any manner will be required to leave. If they do not, the game may be forfeited to the other team.

For ages 9-12 practice locations are assigned to teams. With games being held on weekday evenings, practices are normally held on weekends. Practices are of significant importance at this level, as the necessary technical and tactical skills cannot be learned just by playing the game. The emphasis in practice is on developing basic skills involving controlling the ball (dribbling, receiving, stopping), passing, and shooting. Team play and positional play are also taught.